The Power of Asking For Help

Lifebuoy. Photo: ranieldiaz via flickr/CC BY 2.0

At what point in facing a challenge should we resort to asking for help?

The trick here is the word “resort”.

In spite of our better judgments, most of us wait until we’re stuck in the quicksand of a problem before we turn to someone for advice or counsel. But why wait until we’re desperate to seek out assistance? Why let ourselves get to a point of anxiety and frustration when it’s often altogether unneeded?

Why not, instead, make asking for help a built-in part of our work process?

There’s this metaphor in a book by Stephen Covey I read a while back, about the importance of sharpening a saw between cuts, so that the saw doesn’t get stuck in the wood it’s working through.  

“We must never become too busy sawing to take time to sharpen the saw.”

Dr. Stephen R. Covey

When we get busy, it’s easy to spend all of our time working and grinding away at whatever to-do item is looming overhead. But we should remember to find time to “sharpen our saws”, in the sense of finding ways to get better and more efficient at our work. Allowing us to ultimately get more done.

Asking for help is one of the many ways we can seek to “sharpen our saws” as we’re heading into new tasks. And the earlier we seek assistance, the less likely we are to get stuck.

Broaden your perspective

Leading product management for a team can be a lonely job. Often your peers — like the head of engineering or marketing — can’t relate to the specific challenges you face.

I found myself in this situation back when I was running product for Plaxo. As described in a previous post, I was facing a whole host of frustrating challenges. Fortunately, my boss at the time was super supportive and recommended I join Collaborative Gain, something he had received a lot of value from over the years.

Collaborative Gain is an organization founded by Phil Terry that’s anchored by a semi-annual retreat with “asking for help” as its cornerstone.

As a participant, you join a year-round “council” of 15-20 professionals in your line of work, from different organizations and industries. The council remains stable over time (save for an average turnover of 2 or 3 members a year).

This week marks my 14th retreat with my council.

Around the time of my first retreat I was considering applying Lean Startup methods to try various pivots we might make with the business. It was a big moment for myself and the company, and I wasn’t totally confident in my approach. Through what we call a “Request For Help” I led my council through the situation, and the approach I was considering. They not only gave me the confidence I needed to proceed, but also helped me fine-tune the approach, and advised me on how to best position it to my staff.

We often think our situations are unique. But more often than not, they fit into larger patterns that actually are quite common. Having access to a wider range of perspectives and experiences illustrates this, and allows you to apply the lessons already learned by others.

Ask your boss

External peers really help in diversifying your perspective, but perspective isn’t the only thing we should be asking for help with.  

It isn’t always comfortable for you or your boss, but if there’s something in their power that could enhance your performance, it’s necessary that you make it clear to them. It might be something you need their help fighting for. It might be a new challenge. A promotion. Or a more flexible schedule.

Whatever it is you need, be proactive and make it clear to them.

Hit the books

Pursuing higher education is often connected with career advancement, with the educational virtues regarded as almost an afterthought. A means to an end. But a big reason I went back to school for my MBA was fill-in a personal knowledge gap — to understand how product and business leaders think. One of the most valuable aspects of my time at Haas was applying the HBS Case Method where, again, we gained perspective around what previous business leaders did right or wrong by placing ourselves in their shoes. By covering dozens of cases we racked up experience that would have taken decades to learn first hand.

Of course, education comes in many forms, and you never know what new lesson might change your entire outlook on things.

Ask for feedback

Feedback is a gift, and if you don’t ask for it you won’t always get it. For an individual, it might be 360 surveys. For an organization, it might be employee NPS.

If your boss isn’t giving you regular feedback, or maybe they skipped your recent review — take initiative and ask for it. Present your self-review to them and ask for their assessment.

Whatever format suits your situation, don’t wait till it lands at your feet. Be proactive about identifying weaknesses and figuring out how to work around them.

“We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve.”

Bill Gates

Early in a career, it can feel like everyone but yourself has it figured out – and if you want to move up, you’ve got to start being the one with the answers. But the people who move up and lead prosperous careers do have something figured out — asking for help.  

Everyone has their gaps. Gaps in perspective, gaps in wisdom, and gaps in a skillset. The gaps really aren’t important though – what’s important is what you do about them.

Asking for help should be an early stage of our routine. Something we do automatically – like muscle memory. Without prideful or timid hesitation.

By viewing assistance, and advice as tools in our wheelhouse, and not just last-resort, life-saving devices, we can save ourselves a lot of time and frustration.

Everyone needs help.

Get it early, and get it often.


Preston Smalley produced in collaboration with Mark Mizera.

Why do we often wait until we’re desperate to seek outside help in our work? Asking for help should be just another step in our process — one that happens early on.

The Unsuspected Danger of Building Good Products

What makes a good product?

Best-in-market technology? Stellar user reviews? Right time of entry? Each of these factors indicates potential, but in truth, a product could have all three of these items going for it and still tank-it in the market. Just ask any of the 75% of venture-backed companies who fail to return their cash to investors.

So what’s happening?

Turns out, a lot of times, people are just focusing too much on quality.

The Difference Between Quality and Product-Fit

Sounds strange, right? Focusing too much on quality. But it’s true. In the early stages of building a product, more attention should actually be allocated towards the overall fit of your product within the lives of your users.

There’s an important difference between the quality of a product and product-fit. “Quality” is how well a product solves a customer issue. “Product-Fit” is a product’s ability to make the customer solve the issue, using your product. And beyond picking your product just once, Larry Page looks for it to pass the “toothbrush test” and be used twice a day.

The quality of a product is important. And quality does factor in to the overall fit of a product. But quality is not everything. Factors like price also play a significant role in the overall fit of a product vs. the other options in the market.

The original Echo was nothing to look at and lacked “skills” but sure found Product-Fit

Take the Plaxo story for example.

As a division of Comcast, the team at Plaxo was developing a product to solve the issue of Contact List disorganization. At the time I was the GM at Plaxo and working hard with the team on this shiny new product: The Plaxo Personal Assistant. It had premium, automated features. Integrated, cutting-edge database technology (Cassandra). Machine Learning. It was a beautifully-crafted product in a wide-open market. To boot, seemingly every working business professional griped and groaned about the issue of Contact List disorganization, and there we were: proudly holding the answers.

And then we went to market…

Our quality was through the roof. Demand was high, and competition was low. What better conditions could you ask for?

Product Page for Plaxo Personal Assistant (2011)

Well, there we stood. And what we got…

……………………..

………..

… was crickets.

As a product person, this hurt. Everything I had built up to this point in my career had worked. How could I expect people to trust my judgement after a huge failure like that?

Around the same time as this letdown, Eric Ries was gaining traction with his Lean Startup movement. I went to the meetups and heard Eric talking about the hundreds of other failing startups out there. He argued that ideas should be built simpler and proven faster to avoid overinvesting in them. Everything he was describing was exactly my pain at the time.

We invested two years’ worth of time and money developing a high quality product that no one would pay for. Dwelling on quality and neglecting product-fit With Lean methodologies failure still happens, but it happens faster, and allows you to move on sooner to the next idea. Failure becomes a valuable part of the process and not some ominous threat.With concepts like Minimum Viable Product we could’ve spent under six months teasing out these unknowns earlier on in the process. The fact that our price-point was too high and our entire initial business plan needed major adjustments would’ve been quickly evident.

I came away from this experience with a conviction that that overinvesting in a product’s quality, and waiting too long to shift that focus over to its overall fit within the market, is a serious pitfall. Equipped with these new methodologies, we then tried out some other ways of pivoting the business, and they, too, seemed not to fit in their markets. But we had found a way to get to this point in the process in a fraction of the time it had taken us before.

Team whiteboard at Plaxo as we explored possible pivots (2011)

At this point we had verified that there was no way to grow the business and recommended Plaxo be shut down. I expected I would part with the company but the management team at Comcast noticed the value in what we had gone through and asked me to apply what we were learning to their TV business. And so my work at Comcast Silicon Valley began.

We’re still applying the Lean methodologies today for our new product offerings and seeing success with it. Even if that success means failing quickly and getting to those products that do fit in the market and ultimately succeed in influencing the lives of our customers. Ash Maurya’s Lean Canvas is still a great way to flesh out a variety of business models–I’m even using it on a project today.  And never again will I over-build large and expensive products without testing for product-fit early on.

Lean Canvas by Ash Maurya

Preston Smalley produced in collaboration with Mark Mizera.

Too many companies get distracted by quality when building new products. Focus your efforts to quickly establish “product-fit” with the market and real influence over user’s daily life.

Billy Bean character in 2011 Moneyball (via Filmofilia)

The Dos and Don’ts of Leading Inherited Product Teams

Know Your Game Plan before Stepping into a New Locker-room

How do you Product Manage teams that know more about a product than you do?

When Product Managers inherit pre-existing products (whether it’s a change of company or an internal re-org) there are a lot of factors that need to be locked-down. Team Dynamics. Product Strategy. Performance Assessment Timelines.

Having a clear game plan in these situations can help you stay on the offensive, and not just feel you’re digging your product out of a hole. Below are some dos and don’ts I’ve picked up along the way after going through this process a number of times myself.

Game plans often need adjustments, but some truths remain constant and can be used to guide decisions as you move forward.

Do: Establish the Right KPI’s

Right as you step into a new product, figure out how the teams are measuring success.

How are we tracking performance? I’ve seen both extremes here. Teams that are drowning in data, and teams with no data at all. What’s the objective of your product? And what is the best metric to measure this objective? Getting to the right metric for your product is important.

I like Dave McClure’s Pirate Metrics, “AARRR!”, as well as Jonathan Kim’s refresher of the model.

What’re your retention metrics? You’re being judged on how much you’re moving it forward – it’s your responsibility to find the best way to measure success.

Define success for your product and illustrate that you’re doing a good job. This is your best chance to setup the goal posts–because if you don’t someone else will.

Don’t: Lead Blindly

Just as you shouldn’t blindly go along with whatever KPI’s were previously in use, you also want to avoid blindly doing what you think execs want you to do. Don’t build products without actively understanding why you’re building them.

Following orders without reason is not a strategy.

Analyze the issues your product is aiming to solve and make data-driven decisions. Read more on How to Say No to Your Boss in a previous post.

Do: Focus Your Strategy

Are the teams utilizing random, or no, feature prioritization? Are there disorganized backlogs? Is there a software methodology in place?

Whatever the current picture, these items need to be established from the outset.

Consider bringing in outside perspectives. Whether it’s a design consultant, or someone who can help to shape your strategy. It helps on multiple levels to seek fresh and objective approaches to the problems the team’s been living with for months or years. While you may be thought of as the “outside” perspective it may be more effective for you to facilitate that process and have an ally.

Seek to build a strategy that’s based on the objective of the product, and centered on customer needs.

An outsider’s perspective in Moneyball really helped Billy Bean (via Filmofilia)

Don’t: Think You Have Nothing but Time

People can tend to think too long-term in these situations. Deciding they need to completely redo the app. Start all over, in a new direction. Thinking, “it may take us a year and a half but it’s going to be worth it once we get there.”

Leaders often underestimate how much time they have. They take a long term, waterfall approach to rebooting the app of the team but fail to realize they need to produce results in the short-term in order to get to make it to those further-out time-frames.

The reality is, as a leader, you’re often judged much sooner than you’d like to be.

Do: Get Early Wins

It’s important to have a long-term strategy and make investments that are going to pay-off in the long run. But it’s also important to get some smaller wins under your belt along the way. Identify ways to move the product forward between now and the three month mark. Then again at the sixth month mark.

These may seem small, but it can signal to the rest of the organization: look, things are changing. Things are getting better. We’re making improvements.

Some of those early wins that you chose to go after can be useful teaching moments for your teams, and they can also buy you time to go after the goals you’ve set further-out. In business school a good deal of focus was spent on “change management” principles like those of John Kotter’s Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail [$] in the HBR. Around that time, I posted some thoughts on large company inertia on my website as well.

Don’t: Create Toxicity

It may sound obvious, but some leaders who step into an environment with poor cross-functional relations, see an opportunity to create camaraderie around their shared, negative sentiments. It’s “Us vs. Them”. Essentially fanning the flames of dysfunction and creating toxic cross-functional dynamics.

While this may create an instant gel around you and your team, it won’t pull the cross-functional teams together. And until you’re able to unpack that and create a collaborative environment amongst the other teams you have to work with, you’ll be drudging through a negative work environment.

Do: Get In-Tune with Team Dynamics

What’s going on? Are the different functional areas collaborating with each other?

When stepping in to manage a product team a couple years ago I found that Engineering, UX Design, and Product weren’t communicating. They were all completely silo’ed, which wasn’t helping the product. This is a good example of an instance where I brought in an outside perspective who was able to reboot everything and get it humming along. I was given a different area to manage after doing well with that team and to this date they’re still a well-functioning unit.

See what other dysfunctions there may be. Who’s getting in the way? Move them out of the team, or the company – quickly.

Who’s being undervalued? Find the diamond in the rough. Can they take on more responsibility?

Don’t: Think You Have All the Answers

Between implementing all your clever frameworks and reboots, don’t forget to listen to the team members.

Leaders seem especially prone to this mistake – failing to listen to the teams – when a product is failing and they step into fix it. It’s intuitive to think the quality of a product is reflective of the teams but sometimes this just couldn’t be further from the truth. Often you’ll find the team members themselves are frustrated with the product and have a pile of ideas that nobody seems to be listening to.

So listen.

If you were a coach stepping into to work in a new organization, you’d want to understand who your star players are. Who are the people that are going to be creating problems in the locker room? Who’s really talented but has a bad attitude? In sports though, the KPI’s are straightforward.

You’re judged on your wins. In Product, wins can be much more ambiguous. Getting clarity on what type of wins you and your teams should be going after will bring a lot more focus and success to your efforts.


Preston Smalley produced in collaboration with Mark Mizera.

Inheriting product teams can be tricky. Side-step common mistakes to get early wins and maintain success in the long run.

The One Question Your Product Demo Should Answer

Wizard of Oz Experiments, Pixar, and Other Elements of Product Storytelling

Why do we demonstrate products?

Should we be demonstrating products?

What’s happening beneath the surface of an effective Product Demo? Where should we be focusing our energy when creating them?

What makes these things tick?

Steve Job’s memorable Product Demo of the original iPhone (Jan 2007)

Product Demos can do a lot of good for your products. But there is one specific result that a well-crafted Product Demo creates that far outweighs any others.

They answer the simple question:

What’s in it for them?


Direct the efforts of your Product Demo toward showing audiences why they care about your product with the three following steps.

Step 1: Wizard-of-Oz It

As Product People, it’s natural to want to show off our prized creations. We might cavalcade our products through the streets, if the marketing budget allowed it. But, alas, we have to get our kicks during the Engineering Demos, because the Product Demo is for the consumer. And the consumer doesn’t care about the hoops or scrums, sprints, long jumps or high jumps our teams had to go through to make these things.

They just want to know what’s in it for them.

A well-focused Product Demo demonstrates how a product can serve end users. It does not demonstrate the actual product, itself.

There’s a difference.

Watching how a product can serve end users is like watching a highlight reel. The latter can feel like being forced to sit through an entire sporting event in the span of your five-minute demo, if you make the audience follow you through every single screen within your app.

Keep things focused on what’s in it for the audience by crafting the Hero Case of your product. The ideal scenario in which an end user benefits from the product.

The Wizard of Oz (MGM, 1939

This is where Wizard of Oz Experiments come in. As many of us know, a Wizard of Oz Experiment is one in which the subject thinks the computer program their testing is autonomous, but is actually being operated by a hidden person. One of human’s greatest strengths is our ability to imagine. We’re able to vividly picture elaborate scenarios in our heads on a whim and can be so enthralled by these imaginary moving pictures that we forget where we are. Why get in the way of that?

Set up a presentation that transports the audience into the Hero Case. And don’t take them out of it with unnecessary distractions like logins and page loading screens.

Wizard-of-Oz It.

The audience’s ability to visualize themselves using the product will make this type of demo feel realer than the actual thing.

Step 2: Tailor the Hero Case to Every Audience

Just as users aren’t concerned with the inner-workings of a product, not all end users will have the same Hero Case with your product.

In a tweet I have saved, former Pixar Storyboard Artist Emma Coats shares advice about storytelling that bears similarity to this notion.

Just as writers and audience members will have different ideas about what’s interesting, individual audience members will have varying ideas about that, too.

Consider your audience and tailor that Hero Case you present to them to match their profiles. If you’re interviewing with a reporter or a journalist, cater it to their beat. They’ll be doing this later on anyways, so take control of how that message gets shaped. If you go on the air with a local radio host, tie in a hometown, or two.

XFINITY X1 Olympics Product Demo (2018)

And if you happen to be presenting the XFINITY X1 platform for the Olympics to a group of youth figure skaters in Nashville, who really love the twenty year old figure skater Bradie Tennell, it only makes sense to show them how to soak up every second of their hero’s possible screen time. Right?

Plus, there’ll be plenty of other chances to show off the rest of the marquee Olympians (e.g. Shaun White).

In a great piece in the First Round Blog a while back, Rob Falcone argued this in reference to startup pitches, “Your Product Demo Sucks Because It’s Focused on Your Product

Good demos don’t have to be perfect for the product. They have to be perfect for the audience.

Rob Falcone (2014)

Step 3: Storyboard The Hero Cases

I’m a big fan of Pixar. I value a lot of the concepts in Ed Catmull, the president and co-founder’s book on fostering creative environments; and I also just enjoy the sheer awesomeness of seeing a scene from the first Toy Story movie get pitched on a storyboard.

Watch Joe Ranft Storyboard Pitch a Scene from the Original Toy Story

When drafting up the Hero Cases to present in your demos, storyboarding can be a really useful tool. When you label each card that represents a scene, if you will, in a particular Hero Case; the words you write down on the card naturally become the script for the demo. It’s a helpful way to figure out how to paint the picture you want the audience to visualize.


In movies, we don’t usually see characters doing things like chores, or brushing their teeth. Myriad exceptions exist of course, but even the exceptions are intentional. The filmmakers include them to reveal something about the character, or to set up the next scene. But every scene that makes the final cut in a movie is necessary to the plot. And if a scene is not necessary to the plot, it’s cut.

Take a look at the script of your demos and see if any sections don’t pertain to the plot of your Hero. Anything unrelated to the Hero Case is a distraction.

Stay focused, and make it clear to the audience what’s in this for them.


Thanks for reading! Please comment anything I missed or approaches you’ve found to get audiences more engaged. And for more on the Art and Science of Product Demos, check out my field guide to demos:

3 Practices for Building Strong Presentations

Preston Smalley produced in collaboration with Mark Mizera

Audiences want to know one thing about your products – Wizard of Oz Experiments, Pixar, and Product Storyboards bring it front-and-center.

How to Say “No” to Your Boss

Or Worse: Your Boss’s Boss

It’s a product manager’s worst nightmare:

An Exec gets an idea from a teenager that lives next door. Imbued with optimism, the higher-up urges you and your team to drop everything and put all hands on deck. This is where we should be focusing right now.

Great.

Well, not only do you disagree with the efficacy of this proposed feature, but you’ve also seen the train wrecks these situations can cause. Teams get frustrated by being told to do something without understanding why it’s important. Execs get frustrated by a lack of production.

Your instinct is to push back.

But is there any good way to say “no” to your boss? And if there is a good way to do it, is it ever a good idea in the first place? For me, the answers are: yes, and definitely.

If you’re in a leadership role, working within a hierarchy, being able to say no to your boss can actually be an essential skill for success. If done correctly, it can make you a better leader, a more valuable employee, and a more reliable teammate.

Plus you’ll never actually have to say the word “no” to your boss.

Here’s how:

1. Stop Thinking in “Yes” and “No’s”

The first step in effectively saying “no” to your superiors – when it seems necessary – is to stop thinking in “yes” and “no’s”. This part’s really about good listening.

When a superior gives a sudden order, it’s natural to analyze the order itself. But by immediately jumping to that step, you’re missing the bigger picture. Before rushing to give this person an answer, ask them some questions about the idea they’re proposing.

Create a dialogue with them and, eventually, your team members.

2. Identify the Issue

Just as great art often comes from pain and suffering, great ideas often come from problems and difficulties. But in a business, some issues are more important than others. Find out where this idea came from. What customer issue would this feature be solving?

The issue at the root of an idea is more important than the idea itself. An idea may be interesting, but if the problem it solves isn’t that important, than the idea really isn’t as valuable as it may seem.

3. Enable Your Team Members to Weigh In

Once you’ve identified the underlying issue, go back with your team members and evaluate the problem. adult-analyzing-brainstorming-1080865

Bring in the data: Are we losing customers from this issue? Might we gain users by solving it? Are we already solving it? Might this new idea, in fact, be a better solution?

If it becomes evident that this issue is significant, take a moment to explore other viable solutions, and weigh them against the original proposition. If, on the contrary, the underlying issue is revealed to be insignificant, it’s probably best the feature not be built.

4. Sleep On It

Whether you found the underlying issue to be significant or insignificant, take a page from old wisdom and sleep on it.

Even if you manage to complete this process within the same business day, you don’t want this person to feel like they’re being brushed off. Aside from the notion that you probably owe it to this person to give their idea at least a full day or two’s worth of consideration, you never know. This part may surprise you.

You might have an idea yourself. Someone from your team may send you an overlooked piece of data they stumbled across.

I could’ve used this advice earlier in my career. There was a instance at eBay years ago that I can remember clear as day. While figuring out how to enable users to find items that accepted PayPal, an Exec suggested we have the logo pop up on every search result that featured the service (already accepted by 95% of sellers). At the time I was a very-much green UX designer and I’m thinking in my head, this guy wants to make the website look like the sidewalls on a NASCAR track. Only the problem was I wasn’t just thinking this in my head. I actually jumped out of my chair and shared my reaction. At the time I was so green I didn’t even understand that my actions were unadvisable. It just seemed so wrong I had to stand up.

drawing of eBay search results on a whiteboard illustrating a PayPal logo listed next to every item for sale.
Whiteboard drawing of proposed eBay Search Results with PayPal logo on EVERY row (2002)

I realize now that while my stance may have been justified, there was a better way to go about expressing it.

If the circumstances allow it, give yourself a chance to process the findings before presenting them.

5. Present a Data-Driven Decision

Most of all you must follow up.

Never assume that, if you’ve found the idea to be something you shouldn’t pursue, that you just leave it there. If you don’t follow up with the Exec they will naturally think you ARE pursuing the idea. And if they ask you about it later, you’ll be on your back-feet in terms of reporting on your earlier process (steps 1-4)–and will need to start over.

In the end, you can let the data speak for the decision.

Demonstrate that you’ve analyzed the issue at the root of the idea. You’ve explored viable options. And ultimately you’ve landed upon the solution that best aligns with company goals.

And if this means essentially saying no to an Executive’s idea, at least you’ve followed a judicious and egalitarian process. You’ve done what you’re paid to do.

A good executive will be able to see that.


Preston Smalley produced in collaboration with Mark Mizera

Five steps to pivot prescriptive solutions proposed by execs in a way that leads to effective outcomes for your products and teams.

280 characters = Navel Gazing

Twitter’s move to test doubling the character limit of tweets this week can’t help but remind me of internal discussions we used to have 10 years ago at eBay around Item Title length. In hindsight those discussions were pure navel gazing and distracted us from the core issues our business faced. I fear Twitter is doing the same today.

55 Characters

eBay Search Results

eBay Search Results (circa 2008)

In the beginning when Pierre Omidyar built eBay to help his fiancée collect Pez dispensers on eBay (spoiler alert: this was startup lore more than truth) he placed a limit on the number of characters a seller could use in their title: 55 characters. This stuck for a number of years however sellers would often complain that they would like more space to describe their item. As we discussed it internally at the company several reasons emerged as to why it would be a bad idea:

  • It would erode listing fees like adding a second category (doubling listing fees) or adding a subtitle (50 cents). Remember these listing fees made up about a third of eBay’s revenue at that time (balance was final value fees, paypal transaction fees).
  • It would make search results less relevant. eBay at the time worked on a pure title search and so by allowing sellers to add more words would mean some items only tangentially related to the keywords would appear (thru keyword spamming).
  • It would be harder to visually scan. Both the item page and search results would be harder to read with a longer title. In face there was some concern that even the search results loading time would be adversely impacted.

eBay Logo Circa 2008And so it went on. The topic was discussed at length and always controversial. Eventually in 2011 the company decided to expand it to 80 characters to align with Amazon and other online retailers platforms. At that point the search infrastructure had improved tremendously and was able to still provide relevant results. Did it fundamentally change eBay’s business in the end or help in its battle with Amazon? No.

So what’s the big deal for Twitter?

I think the lesson here for Twitter is one of putting heir energy and focus on topics that really matter. For example they should focus on the fact that Twitter is a two-sided marketplace of publishers and readers. Publishers are looking for audience and to get their message out. Readers are looking for interesting topics from the general (celebrities, politicians, news) to the more nitch (product management, design). And yet the way it’s positioned is not nearly that clear–and this 280-char test isn’t helping.

Ironically Medium, who already has a much clearer two-sided value prop and now business model, is doing exactly this.

Twitter’s move to test doubling the character limit of tweets this week can’t help but remind me of internal discussions we used to have 10 years ago at eBay around Item Title length. In hindsight those discussions were pure navel gazing and distracted us from the core issues our business faced. I fear Twitter is […]

Join product team shaping future of TV

I’m hiring for some pretty exciting roles. As a product manager within Comcast’s TVX team you will shape the way people think about and watch TV. You’ll join a team that is rapidly changing the landscape of TV from a position of massive scale. If you or someone you know is interested, keep reading and be sure to reach out.

Here are just a few things our team accomplished recently together:

  • Shaped experience for the Rio 2016 Olympics which drove Nielsen ratings in X1 households significantly higher than non-Comcast due to the superior sports experience and integrated streaming content.
  • Innovating around our Voice Remote enabling kids, sports fans, and movie lovers to easily and quickly get to what they want to watch all thru just using their voice.
  • XFINITY Stream App is now one of the most popular ways to watch TV on your favorite mobile device bringing together live streaming with your personalized DVR. Also added Roku with more connected devices on the way. Recent ad.
  • Our X1 TV platform won an Emmy for its user experience–and we continue to make it better, deploying new features and functionality all the time. Just a few months ago we integrated Netflix in a way that Reed Hastings himself called “the most convenient UI (user interface) we’ve ever had.”

roku_launch_teamThere are several product management roles available on my team from entry level to seasoned product leadership roles. Overall they look like roles you’ve seen at other technology companies. You’ll collaborate with other product managers and colleagues from design, development, business, marketing, editorial, support, legal, and operations to develop product strategies and requirements; successfully deliver new features to our customers and then measure their success. Rinse and repeat.

Today there are at least four roles open across two of my teams (although not all are posted):

  • Expanding Content on X1: Looking for two Senior Product Managers one focused on how we include popular apps across Web Video and Music onto X1 and another looking at directly integrating streaming video content within the experience (similar to Netflix). These two positions are based in Silicon Valley.
  • XFINITY Stream and TV Remote Apps: Looking for a Sr. Director of Product to lead a team including a couple open positions they’d be able to fill as they see fit (entry-level PM role as well as a much more experienced Principal Product Management role). These three positions are based in Philadelphia.

I’m looking to build a diverse team and one that taps into people that bring with unique backgrounds. Our products aim to serve people of all types looking to watch TV—what perspective will you bring?

I’m hiring for some pretty exciting roles. As a product manager within Comcast’s TVX team you will shape the way people think about and watch TV. You’ll join a team that is rapidly changing the landscape of TV from a position of massive scale. If you or someone you know is interested, keep reading and […]

OneTwoSee + Comcast = Happy Sports Fans

Today at Comcast we announced the acquisition of Philly-based sports startup OneTwoSee will join the rest of my Sunnyvale-based team to form what I think will be the best sports technology team in the business. From my post on Comcast Voices:

They not only bolster our efforts to build a best-in-class sports TV experience but also underscore our commitment to partnering with and investing in the local start-up community in this great city. I’d like to personally welcome Jason Angelides, Chris Reynolds and the rest of their team; they will retain their Philadelphia offices – just across the street from the Comcast Center – and report up through me.

OneTwoSee has played a huge role in our efforts to make X1 an awesome place for sports fans. In the past year, we’ve worked with them to reengineer our X1 sports app – initially launched with the platform to help fans check scores, standings, and schedules for games – into an interactive and immersive companion experience giving fans more data and statistics than ever before.

Usage of the sports app is now up fivefold from the winter of 2015 and now used by one in four X1 households on a weekly basis.

I’m so happy that Comcast’s been so supportive of my team’s efforts including this latest move. And if you don’t believe my words, here’s a mug shot of me with the founders as we announced the news… 🙂

Finally, here’s a roundup of some more of the day’s coverage:

Eric Fisher of the Sports Business JournalComcast Acquires OneTwoSee

Today at Comcast we announced the acquisition of Philly-based sports startup OneTwoSee will join the rest of my Sunnyvale-based team to form what I think will be the best sports technology team in the business. From my post on Comcast Voices: They not only bolster our efforts to build a best-in-class sports TV experience but also underscore […]

Getting Products out from under the MIDDLE of the Bell Curve and Exceeding Expectations (SVPMA)

Given the key role Product Managers play in creating the environment for their teams… what must they do to avoid the bell curve of mediocre products that unfortunately are the norm? I shared my perspective as the guest speaker at the SVPMA (Sept 3, 2014) based on my own experiences and other authors/speakers that I trust.

Presenting @ SVPMA

I discussed specific ways to set clear goals and establish the right metrics. Dipping into my eBay days, I shared a little known story of the importance of asking for forgiveness rather than permission in driving innovation that resulted in the launch of the eBay iPhone app.

Some other takeaways from this talk include:

  • How to focus on the right, few, customer adoption metrics (e.g. AAARR). More is often not better and can distract from the main goal
  • How defining your product’s purpose often improves working relationships with designers and engineers so you aren’t left arguing about the “what” or the “how
  • How to avoid getting in the executive micromanagement web especially if they are distracted by the “flavor of the month” or “pet feature” ideas
  • How to drive stealth projects or go through quick business case or product prototyping within a big company.

I was pleased to host the event at Comcast Silicon Valley where I work.

A full review of the talk posted on the SVPMA website.

Given the key role Product Managers play in creating the environment for their teams… what must they do to avoid the bell curve of mediocre products that unfortunately are the norm? I shared my perspective as the guest speaker at the SVPMA (Sept 3, 2014) based on my own experiences and other authors/speakers that I […]

Running an Innovation Center at a Fortune 500 Company

I recently spoke on how to run an innovation center within a large company at both the Lean Startup conference in SF and the Strategic Planning Innovation Summit in NYC. As part of the leadership team running the Comcast Silicon Valley Innovation Center, I’ve learned a lot about what works and what doesn’t especially within a BIG company.

How can you apply Lean Startup principles at your company? I have 6 pieces of advice:

  1. Ask for forgiveness, not permission
    The eBay mobile app almost didn’t get built as the mobile team was restructured away shortly before Apple announced the App Store in 2008. By “hiding” a small team of people building MVP (Alan Lewis, Ken Sun, Karlyn Neal) enough momentum was established that the Exec team went along.
  2. Build credibility thru projects–then scale
    The Comcast Silicon Valley Innovation Center was built out of an earlier acquisition made a couple years earlier in Plaxo. By running projects under the Plaxo brand and then Comcast Labs, credibility in the approach was established with the executive team. Over time its scaled to include higher profile projects, such as SEEiT.
  3. Don’t just swing for homeruns
    We take a VC mindset for “funding” concepts at the center. Ideas can come from anywhere (often Hack Days) and get evaluated using a Lean Canvas. Receiving “Seed” funding means we might assign a few engineers for a month or so. If they prove their hypothesis they might get “Series A” funding where they could build an MVP. Meanwhile we’re always looking for an “exit” which could be an “acquisition” from another internal business unit–so a solid “double” in baseball helps offset the “strikeouts” that might occur.
  4. Adapt Lean Canvas for your company
    I adapted Ash Maurya’s Lean Canvas to better fit within the enterprise. Cost included the number of FTEs / time and Revenue includes indirect improvements to retention/acquisition. Finally a new cell was added for “Strategic Fit” which evaluates how well the concept fits within the corporate strategy and who on the Exec team will sponsor it.
    leancanvas_adapted
  5. Watch out for corporate antibodies
    Organizations are just like the body and will attack what they see as “foreign objects” (different ways of doing things). You need to be aware of who’s toes you might be stepping on and building allies at the exec level is important. It’s also helpful to understand resource allocation is often a “zero-sum-game” so don’t scale your resources too fast or they become a target for others looking for funding.
  6. Use vanity metrics (but don’t believe them)
    As you analyze using rate-based metrics that ruthlessly look at acquisition, activity, and retention is the only way to go. However its important that you present your product fairly alongside others at the company. Shining a bright light on all things wrong with your project may not give you the time you need to pivot and get it where you want it to go. So occasionally, its useful to share “vanity metrics” alongside the equivalents of other products at your company. 😉

Here’s some of my favorite tweets about my talk:

Photo taken by @RedHatInnovate

Photo taken by @RedHatInnovate

https://twitter.com/IE_ClaireW/status/408634548432691200

As with the rest of this blog, the above are my personal views and not that my employer. 

I recently spoke on how to run an innovation center within a large company at both the Lean Startup conference in SF and the Strategic Planning Innovation Summit in NYC. As part of the leadership team running the Comcast Silicon Valley Innovation Center, I’ve learned a lot about what works and what doesn’t especially within a BIG company. […]